Home » Merchant Ships by Era: Age of Sail Merchant Ships, World War Ii Merchant Ships, Imperial Eagle, Princess Royal, Ouzel Galley, Hector by Books LLC
Merchant Ships Era: Age of Sail Merchant Ships, World War Ii Merchant Ships, Imperial Eagle, Princess Royal, Ouzel Galley, Hector by Books LLC

Merchant Ships

Era: Age of Sail Merchant Ships, World War Ii Merchant Ships, Imperial Eagle, Princess Royal, Ouzel Galley, Hector by Books LLC

Published June 12th 2010
ISBN : 9781157983644
Paperback
46 pages
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 About the Book 

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Age of Sail Merchant Ships, World War Ii Merchant Ships,MorePurchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Age of Sail Merchant Ships, World War Ii Merchant Ships, Imperial Eagle, Princess Royal, Ouzel Galley, Hector, Spanish Ship Nuestra Seora de Atocha, Octavius, Ss Martti Ragnar, Ss Sauternes, Resolution. Excerpt: The Imperial Eagle (originally named Loudoun, also spelled Louden, Loudin, and Lowden) was a 400 ton (Builders Old Measurement) British merchant ship that sailed on maritime fur trading ventures in the late 1780s. It was under the command of Captain Charles William Barkley until confiscated in India. The ship, Loudoun, was a decommissioned East Indiaman. It was among the first ships used in the trading system that developed in the 1780s, in which sea otter pelts were collected on the Pacific Northwest coast of North America, through trade with the indigenous peoples, then taken to Guangzhou (Canton) or Macau, China, where they could usually be sold at a profit. The Hawaiian Islands, only recently discovered, were a key way station, with many trading vessels spending the winter there. This maritime fur trading system had originated from the voyages of James Cook, during which the value of sea otter pelts in China was unexpectedly discovered. Although the Imperial Eagle was British owned and operated, the ship masqueraded as a vessel of the fictitious Austrian East India Company, and sailed under the flag of Austria. In fact the ship was owned by various British supercargoes, including some in China and several East India Company directors in England. They called their partnership the Austrian East India Company. John Reid and Daniel Beale were two of the supercargoes. Beale, operating out of Canton, acted as the Prussian agent in that port. The real Austrian East India Company had nothing to do with the Imperial Eagle. It had exis... More: http://booksllc.net/?id=26218064