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Eczema William Tilbury Fox

Eczema

William Tilbury Fox

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230343051
Paperback
24 pages
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1870 edition. Excerpt: ...in which the control ofMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1870 edition. Excerpt: ...in which the control of the latter over the nutrition of the skin is somewhat lessened- that external irritants, acting locally or generally, and internal agencies, such as the circulation of waste and effete products, may excite eruptive phenomena, and that the changes in the cell-elements may be modified to some extent by the special nutritive proclivities of the individual. Theoretically, where external exciting causes are at work, and the eczematous tendency is not marked, the eruption will be localized- but it may be symmetrical where the exciting cause operates on symmetrical parts, as in the case of eczema of the hands in bakers and washerwomen, or when it acts generally on the surface, as in the case of cold. Where, on the other hand, the immediate excitant of eczema is an internal affair, then is the eczema more or less general, and it is in these cases that we meet with the inflammatory and impetiginous forms. The history of infantile eczema may seem at first sight to stand in antagonism to these propositions- but, on careful analysis, it will be found entirely to confirm their truth. Let us call to mind the concomitants of infantile eczema. The tissues of the skin in the young, in the first place, are rapidly and readily irritated- slight friction, cold, or heat induces mischief, which is unaccountable save on the supposition that there is a great tendency to inflammatory changes involving disturbance of the circulation and celllife of the tissues, incidental to infancy. A bronchitis is as readily evoked as an eczema. So that the skin is not peculiarly sensitive- and if it is possible to excite easily extensive changes in a mucous surface without the presence of any diathesis, it seems indeed strange that we should suppose that...